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. is in the interest of the united states to solve this and get a two-state solution to this? various members of this current administration have said so, and if that's true it would be good to succeed. there are others who are not so sure that it's achievable of that political capital is worth spending on a. that's an important question, important decision for the next administration is the next president wants to do this, he's going to have to build a domestic constituency to overcome opposition. on the question of the iran syria hezbollah act, the administration will have decisions to make about sanctions, about diplomacy, about war. if the iranian regime comes to the table with serious intent, for any reason, either because sanctions are fighting so hard or because they are threats of military strike, or for any other reason, my question as an individual is with the american government take yes for an answer, or will the american government have conditions that are, cannot be met by the other side? and with the administration even consider what was previously called grand bargain, which w
in the united states. but then on wednesday, i saw a thing where bain capital closing down its plant in illinois. ann romney is a reserved shareholder of the bain capital. how is the -- and romney is a reserved shareholder and bain capital. host: let us limit tomorrow humor. this is from last night. instead of a being from the al smith dinner, an appearance by president obama on comedy central's the daily show with john stuart. [video clip] >> how many times a week does he show up in a wet bathing suit to a meeting? >> we had to stop it. we have to put tiles down. but i have to say, he looks pretty good. >host: that is president obama n comedy central with jon storage. he also made comments about libya. we will look at where the candidates stand on foreign policy, foreign affairs and campaign 2012. for now, we are looking at humor. and what role you think plays. does it help or the track to the image you have of him? kentucky, on our line for independents. caller: my comment is but i do not really care for it. i think it just cheapens the issues. they are very serious to people out your sufferin
correspondent ed henry. >> since our founding the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrated religious beliefs of others. >> september 12th, he seems to embrace an idea that his aides will advance over the next two weeks that the ambassador and three other americans were killed in a spontaneous riot over an internet video. he does use the term terror but only in a general sense in context of the september 2001 terror attacks. >>. >> he gives an interview to 60 minutes shortly thereafter. he says nothing that has happened has made him second guess his policies since arab spring. >> i continued to be pretty certain there be bumps in the road. >> because nevada is battleground state. >> he leaves for a campaign trip to las vegas. >> the president of the united states did not postpone a campaign event even though we had been hit. >> i thought that was the biggest strategic mistake of the obama campaign. >> dana was press security in george bush's administration. she is now a fox news host. >> imagine if he would have said as commander in chief, it
was because he was never president of the united states. he was never secretary of state. his highest level position in government of the as ambassador to the soviet union and to yugoslavia. he, himself, would have -- [dogs barking] [laughter] he, himself, would have said these were failed ambassadorships, and, so, why a book on the life of george? my answer, and it's only my answer, it would not be universally agreed with, seems it me, is it's good to write a book about someone who saved western civilization, and while it may be something of an exaggeration to say george kennan saved western civilization, if you think it through, there is a case to be made in this regard because all civilization, in fact, was in peril in the half decade or so of the cold war. anyone in washington predigging some 50 years ago when nuclear weapons reefed lethal proportions on both sides, anyone predicting with confidence that we were going to get out of this alive would have had an uphill battle to make that prediction, and surveys that were taken in that age suggested that most americans fully expected to d
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. the association of the united states army's annual meeting kicks off this week amid pressure to slash spending on conferences. we'll talk about the impact of tighter government travel and conference rules. plus, a look at a compact new realtime facial recognition system that troops can use on the move. but first, the pentagon's new cyber strategy unveiled this month by defense secretary leon panetta makes it clear the u.s. military will take preemptive action if it detects a potential cyber attack that would kill americans or devastate american infrastructure. the aim is to make the threat of counterattack a powerful deterrent. is this the right cyber strategy for america? here with answers is irving la- chow the director of the program on u.s. national security in the information age at the the cent for new american security. irving welcome to the program. >> thank you very much. >> what's the importance of this statement especially at this time? >> i think secretary panetta had two goals in mind in issuing the statemen
went into the united states senate in 2001 with the biggest surpluses in the history of the united states and six years later, left with massive deficits. during his time in the senate, national debt went up by $16,000 every second and in an earlier debate, he conceded spending was a problem when he was in the senate. we also have people who know how to work together. as a nonpartisan mayor in richmond, i worked to cut crime, build schools, and grow the economy, and as a governor in a tough time, we worked to win all kinds of accolades for the state. my opponent, when he was governor, said his job was to knock democrats soft teeth down their whiny throats and took a similar position in the senate, siding against compromise efforts led by then virginia's senior senator john warner. we need to join together to move forward and that's what i'll do as your next united states senator. >> mr. allen, your opening statement. >> thank you, bob, and thank you all for listening and watching this debate. folks, i envision a much better future than what we're having to endure these days and tha
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
are approached or anything happens in your professional lives with the united states government that you have any questions about, please come to this committee. we take the work of whistle- blowers and people who give testimony very seriously. you have been critical to bring out things which would not have -- which would not have come out to. i will close with two comments. that i took away from today. he did not produce security at -- you do not reduce security at the -- the same time as you are increasing hazardous duty pay. it does not make sense. i have not heard that question asked and answered. i only heard that it occurred. i think the state department to take away from today and understanding that that sends a message that says, we will pay you for the risk. we will not pay to have you made safer. that is the impression that anyone would get if you reduce the staffing below recommendations or request an increase the pay. i do not think the men and women who service overseas want. i know the compensation for hardship is important, but safety comes first. i have the marine fellow who work
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all t
of the united states ought not accept any soviet control over eastern europe. we ought to deal with each of these countries separately. we ought to pursue strategies with each of them, economic and the rest, that help them pull away from their dependence upon the soviet union. where the soviet union has acted irresponsibly, as they have in many of those countries, especially, recently, in poland, i believe we ought to insist that western credits extended to the soviet union bear the market rate. make the soviets pay for their irresponsibility. that is a very important objective -- to make certain that we continue to look forward to progress toward greater independence by these nations and work with each of them separately. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i'm not going to continue trying to respond to these repetitions of the falsehoods that have already been stated here. but with regard to whether mr. mondale would be strong, as he said he would be, i know that he has a commercial out where he's appearing on the deck of the nimitz and watching the f- 14's take off. and that's an
president of the united states to help and support this next week in this great nation and to make sure we maintain america as the hope of the earth's protective so much. >> gentlemen, thank you so much. that brings an end to this year's debates in the want to thank lynn university and its students. i leave you with the words of my mom said, go vote. good night. >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [applause] >> as we continue to watch the scene on the campus of lynn university, our phone lines are open. your reaction to this third and final debate. the focus, for policy. first up, rose, a supporter of mitt romney from nevada. good evening. ." >> i wanted to say something about the moderator. been one-sided, i think. i believe in governor romney and i hope people open their eyes and take notice of what's going on in our country. >> thank you for the call. on our twitter page, when you were saying -- and david, dayton, ohio. supporter of the president. >> go ahead. host>> i am
on earth is he not in custody? >> that's the responsibility of the libyan authorities. the united states does not have any capacity to arrest people or act as a police force. the libyan force is sovereign. the problem is libya after gadhafi does not have a strong national police force or army. it's replete with militias. that's the environment in which our diplomats have to work and protect themselves in tripoli as well other places. >> mr. ambassador, are you telling me these new libyans in control are akin to keystone cops or are you telling me these libyans don't give a damn what we want? >> i didn't say either of those things. the libyan authorities are quite friendly with the united states. they had free and fair elections last summer, a moderate group of people were elected. the problem is in libya, as well as egypt and tunisia, these moderate governments are being assaulted by much more radical forces, some of them armed. i do think you ought to focus your attention now on the libyan authorities and what they need to do to bring these killers to justice. >> i don't understand this
women. >> you bet. >> don't write over mitt. >> don't write over the next president of the united states. my oldest son. he just graduated. >> give them hell today. >> thanks for coming. we have a lot to be excited about today. we are here on a corner -- [inaudible] i know there are a lot of small business representatives and employees here today. for your efforts and hard work, give them a hand. [applause] president calvin coolage once remarked that the business of america is business. his words are as true today as they were when he said them nearly 100 years ago. small business drives our economy, fuels or communities and feeds our families. [applause] small businesses like ours represent 97.8% of all employers. we employ half of america's work force and create between 60 respect -- 60% and 80% of job growth in the country. we know how very important those jobs numbers are. i imagine you feel like i do. i need my job, and so do our employees. thankfully here at ball we have secure jobs. you will see trucks coming and going from a long hard day any minute now. i can't imagine the stres
final coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and more recently the u.n. peace envoy to syria. i'll ask him if there's any end in sight for that nation's in sight for that nation's in sight for that nation's in sight for that nation's brutal civil war. and then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk to "the new yorker's" beijing reporter evan osnos about the political tumult in china ahead of the upcoming anointment. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy,
this serious occur in an administration and have a president of the united states in a situation like this say he didn't know? a president must know these things. i don't know which is worse, not knowing or knowing and not stopping it. and what about the mining of the harbors in nicaragua which violated international law? this has hurt this country, and a president's supposed to command. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i have so many things there to respond to, i'm going to pick out something you said earlier. you've been all over the country repeating something that, i will admit, the press has also been repeating-that i believed that nuclear misses could be fired and then called back. i never, ever conceived of such a thing. i never said any such thing. in a discussion of our strategic arms negotiations, i said that submarines carrying ssiles and airplanes carrying missiles we more conventional- type weapons, not as destabilizing as the land-based missiles, and that they were also weapons that -- or carriers-that if they were sent out and there was a change, you could call them back
made it to the united states yea 1975 when i told them that ith, was for a class assignment. finl in one fell swoop, i got my le homework done and the history. e when i land, when i was five not months old, my family come andn you have to understand that family in thefa vietnamese contd doesn't mean that nuclearaal aud context. grandm my family including my mom and dad, my maternal aunt and grandmother and the elder brothers and sisters, just barely escaped saigon in 1975. it was full of twists and turnsk and happenstance. we easily could have been sucke back in vietnam rather than escape to america. so on that day, and it was april 29, 1975, as white chr tristmas layout played out again and again on the american radio station, this was thenel signal for u.s. personnel to s move to our evacuation points and cities. my father who had served in the top vietnamese army understood that it was time that we, too, prepared to leave our home his country. for months, he and his kin had planned possible escape routes and finally decided on one.safe. his cousin had access to a helicopter tha
of the united states. you add those three elements together, and you get the obama hate machine. so i'd just like to say a little bit about each of those elements and open it up for questions until c-span tells us the cameras are turned off. and let's start at those directed against obama. i think criticism of obama -- [inaudible] and every day in front of the white house on pennsylvania avenue there's a crowd of people protesting something, you know? and i love that, i really do. i always make a point of checking out what they're there for, what the issue of the day is. it's a very healthy part of our democracy. and criticism of presidents, of course, has been around for a long time. if you want to go back to the ugliest presidential campaign in history, you could probably go back to 800 and john adams -- 1800 and john adams and thomas jefferson. particularly the followers against each other. so, um, but with president obama it's been attacks not on his policies so much as on him as a person. and we haven't seen that, i don't believe -- and i went back and did a lot of research in president
.d.'s are coming from the united states, in our most complete engineering schools. that is a recipe for disaster. that is a recipe for disaster. we do not ever talk about it. we're just letting the thing unraveled. what about best new engineering schools, which you will be hearing about in a few days, in dallas, and they have a great school, but guess what -- i asked them onetime how many people they have from china, and this university right here, 2000, added to the top. >> this is an example of how we need to modernize our immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scho
murdered four americans at the united states consulate in benghazi on the anniversary of 9/11. americans had questions. who did this and how? should our government have seen it coming? did president obama tried to hide the truth? is this a huge scandal that exposes a failed obama foreign policy? is mitt romney just saying it is. tonight we'll try to give you answers. we'll walk you step by step through the terror of that day and break down the political maneuvering that has followed. we begin with a series of frightening developments and troubling decisions leading up to that horrific night. it's a story you haven't heard. it's told by a man who tried to prevent what happened on september 11th, 2012. >> did you have a close relationship with the ambassador? >> i lived and worked with him for two months when he came on to the time i left, yeah. >> bret: no one understands more the full extent the fiasco that killed stevens. he worked with him for six months before his violent death. 24-year special forces veteran, woods' job was try to prevent such an attack occurring. >> that was my firs
at this in terms of the united states, because as i've said several times, if you want to understand civil religion, just get a tent, and park yourself in the paper plate and the napkin section of k-mart or wal-mart, and as the year goes by, watch the colors change. you've got your valentine's day with the reds and whites, and then we've got st. patty's day, and then i don't know how bunnies and easter eggs and - well, i kind of do - but you've got your yellow and your purple for easter and then we move through memorial day. and fourth of july, memorial day, these are classic civil religious holidays, and if you'll go back and think about our functions of myth - answer profound life questions about meaning, reverence for the past, hope for the future, guide behavior, worshiping of heroes and heroines - all the functions of myth that we see in a religious context are there in a culture to do exactly the same thing: to bind people together as a group, just as it does in religion, where we see it out in the culture, and it's fun to see how that works. it's very - it's difficult because the leaders, th
in pakistan, 75% of the pakistani to identify the united states now as their enemy, not as their supporter or their allies. in many ways, we are seeing a very ill-conceived, irresponsible, and immoral or policy come back to haunt us where the united states foreign policies have been based, unfortunate, on brute military force and wars for oil. under my administration, we will have a foreign policy based on international law and human rights and the use of diplomacy. instead of fighting wars for oil, we will be leading, as america, a leading the fight to put an end to climate change. in afghanistan and iraq, we have spent about $5 trillion. we have seen thousands and thousands of american lives lost, hundreds of thousands of civilian lives lost, about $1 trillion a year being spent on a massive, bloated military, industrial security budget. instead, we need to cut the military budget, right sizes year 2000 levels, and build a true secured here at home, bringing our war dollars home. >> rocky anderson from the justice the party, yet two minutes. >> the question was whether the killings of th
in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda andn people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's no because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> ho
. this could go bad for obama. it's really bad to the united states because this is humiliation for the united states. it's bad for chris stevens and bad for sae9sdz smith and bad for tyrone woods. they are dead. they are gone. >> which brings us back to lieutenant colonel andrew wood who saw the deadly debacle coming. >> bret: i can tell you are emotional about it. the ambassador was killed, first one since 1979. he is your friend. >> it's a huge thing to have a loss like that. i grieve for his loss. i grieve for the loss that we suffer as our nation. it was our job to defend the compound. >> bret: benghazi attacks staggered america. we now have another reason to mourn on 9/11. a new unmistakable warning. islamic terrorists that brutalized our citizens were well armed killers intent on doing us great harm. the brave americans in libya knew that long before we died. the rest of us owe it on to them to under that, too. that is our program. i'm bret baier. thanks for watching. card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn a
that it goes unremarked upon. if you want to know about a country look at the map of the united states in terms of the harbors from the east coast of the united states, the 13 colonies jam packed with natural harbors. the coast of africa collectively few good natural harbors but the east coast was packed with them and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't
that are investing right here in iowa, right here in the united states of america, rebuilding our manufacturing. [applause] i want to control more of our own energy. you heard last night oil production is up, natural gas production is up. we'vee've also said is got to develop a new source of energy and we've got to be more fisht with our economy. so we raised fuel efficiency on cars so your car will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. we had double the amount of renewable energy we generate from wind and solar and buy fuels. today the united states of america is less dependent on foreign oil than any time in the last two decades. so the question -- so the choice you have -- you heard last night, it's not a choice between oil versus solar or natural gas versus wind. we all agree we got to increase oil production and natural gas production. but the question is whether we build on the progress for the new energy source of the future. i'm not going to keep on giving corporate tax funded welfare to oil companies $4 billion a year when we could use that money to promote wind and solar and long-lastin
hearing postponed. >> it in a stunning comeback over the united states, -- >> it in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe -- >> in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe clinched the ryder cup. >> georgia could be set for a post-election standoff. both the ruling party and opposition coalition are claiming victory. >> the former soviet republic has claimed that exit polls give the opposition an edge, but the government claims it will retain its majority. >> opposition supporters have taken to the streets to celebrate victory. georgians went to the polls against a backdrop of prison abuse, a scandal that has damaged the once-popular government of mikhail saakashvili. his name rivals -- his main rival was to move the country into russia. it is not clear when the outcome will be known. let's go live to our reporter following the ballot in georgia. some confusion about the outcome, with both major groups claiming victory. do you have any further details? >> these elections have been a close race from the beginning. what we now hear from tbilisi, is that these electi
-american to attend university explains why race remains a crucial issue in the united states. >> south korean pop star has a u.k. number one. if you haven't heard it, hear this. >> the ridiculously catchy tune with its overtop video has become a global phenomenon. ♪ >> the song, what exactly is gangham style? >> it doesn't have any meaning actually. i'm just saying gangham style which doesn't have that much meaning. it's about some lady and some guys, you know -- >> the video has been viewed on youtube more than 300 million times. has more likes than any other in history. and despite being a self-parody has been affectionately spoofed by the thai navy, a gruche californian lifeguards. -- group of californian lifeguards and even prisoners in a jail. it's the latest in a long line of viral chart hits. remember this one? >> ♪ >> and what about the crazy frogs? but this is one has been more successful worldwide. when you play the song on the radio, people seem to quite like the song because it's catchy. normally with a novelty song like this people hate the song but quite like the video. this wor
of san francisco are supporter of the united states military. san francisco fleetwood association is a nonprofit all volunteer organization that was formed to help organize and execute fleet week. and fleet week in 2012 like 2011 and 2010 has adopted a mission to promote the humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions of the united states military. we also, of course, will have the blue angels and the air show that comes with that. the ships will be coming in and the wonderful liberty call that the wonderful men and women in the armed forces will have in san francisco. the fleet week association also, as i say, has a humanitarian and response. along with the civilian disaster response community, we'll have a senior leader seminar taking place on thursday and friday in which the military and the civilian community learn from one another on how to provide disaster response. i should mention that on wednesday morning out at ocean beach, the marine corps and the navy are setting up what's called the shock trauma platoon, a field hospital you and i might think of as a mass u
in the entire western united states that doesn't have an adequate rail connection and that promise was made because we have the opportunity here to cut the commute for tens of thousands of people everyday in half by this investment. the vast majority of the people don't own a car. they depend on transit. well today through president obama's leadership, secretary lahood leadership, the vision of the leaders on the stage we are here to commit $942 million to fulfill that promise. [applause] >> with the signing of this grant agreement we are taking $942 million paid by california taxpayers and to create jobs now when we need them. we're also using those dollars to improve the quality of life, and as jackie spear pointed out plan for the future and economic prosperity of this whole area. when this subway extension opens as senator feinstein pointed out there will be 44,000 people using this light rail line. what she didn't point out that will make it the second or third busiest light rail in the united states. this is an environment that needs to be made and once it's built are gone the day
and halted travel and flooded entire neighborhoods. at least 40 people were killed in the united states. >>> sandy transitioned from a hurricane to a post-tropical cyclone by the time it hit shore. most people had never seen anything like it. the center of the storm, now over southern ontario moving east. it's left a trail of destruction. a power station in manhattan exploded on monday during the height of the storm cutting electricity to much of the borough. reuters reports at least 8 million peoples and businesses across several states are still without electricity. new yorkers can get around more easily now that buses are running again. but city officials say it will take at least a week to restore rail, water and other services. sandy has been losing strength since monday. its maximum momentary wind speed is around 65 kilometers per hour. the storm has pulled a mass of cold air from the north. snow is falling across eight states. some areas got more than 60 centimeters. and sandy's impact isn't just financial. the u.s. media has been looking at the political ramifications. the presi
is strengthening as it approaches the east coast of the united states. these are live pictures from maryland as the national hurricane center warned of a life-threatening storm surges and hurricane winds. a magazine editors charged with breach of privacy in greece. and election results in the ukraine suggest they might not have an overall majority. welcome to bbc world news. china appears for a change of leadership. how will it affect ordinary people? we will hear from villagers living in the shadows of the great wall. and there's a new environment. the east coast of the united states is waking up to what could soon be a super storm. 140 kilometers per hour winds battering large areas as the hurricane grows in strength. sandy is expected to bring with it a life-threatening storm surge. these are live pictures from new york. the city waking up in darkness at the moment. in maryland, residents are bracing for the category one hurricane. this is live from maryland. 50 million people are affected on the east coast. schools and transport has been closed down. mandatory evacuation of hundreds of t
north korea refugees that made it to the united states in safety. she tells the story through the eyes of the workers on the underground railroad largely people involved in christian relief organizations both here in the united states and in northeastern china who work and at great risk to their own lives trying to open up a channel for north creern refugees to escape. north korea, as you know, is probably the most repressive regime in the world at this stage. it is a place where millions of north korea citizens have literally been starved by an intelligencal government policy over the last ten to fifteen years. it's a place that houses and has housed for well over a decade of serious of -- concentration camps where political prisoners are tortured, sometimes executed for crimes no more serious than listening to a foreign radio broadcast. , reading a bible or disrespecting a picture of the dear leader. it's really a chilling book and it's a book that should be must read for anyone who cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment and the foreign policy concerns
. >> when i'm president of the united states, that unemployment rate is going to come down not because people are giving up and dropping out of the workforce but because we are creating more jobs. i will create jobs and get america working again. >>reporter: governor romney took aims at president obama's plan to raise taxes on wealthy americans by $1 trillion saying that hits the small job market unduly hard and could result in 700,000 jobs simply evaporating. >>trace: we mention governor romney's second battle ground state the day. how is he tailoring the message to the different communities he is visiting? >>reporter: when he comes to st. petersburg area on the west coast of florida he will talk about medicare. it is an important issue through the entire state of florida. early today in virginia he was in coal country meeting with out of the work coal miners talking about what he sees his vision for coal versus president obama's vision. governor romney has been critical of the coal in the past but insists he is a friend and says president obama would be hostile. here is governor romn
for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on monday mitt romney set out his foreign policy plank. in eight days mitt romney and president obama will debate foreign affairs. we will ask the terrific panel what to make of romney's foreign policy. >>> next up, "argo," the amazing little known story of six americans who actually escaped from the embassy in tehran in 1979 and eventually got out of the country. i'll talk to the man at the cia who masterminded the operation. ben affleck plays him on the big screen, but you get the real version with us. >>> finally, drew foust, the president of harvard, on how the civil war changed america. >>> also, do you feel guilty take dagg off from work? don't. it's probably good for your country. i'll explain. >>> but first here's my take. recently intelligence squared a feisty forum in new york debated the proposition better elected islamists than dictators, referring to the choices confronting america in the middle east. the lead
to the president of the united states during the debate? it was deeply disrespectful. tonight, the over the line attacks on this president. >>> and stop the freakout. bill campaigns for the president as new poll numbers in key states bring good news. team obama and look who's stumping today. >>> plus, mitt romney is running away from views on women's issues that he held way, way back earlier this year. today he canceled his appearance on the view and sent his wife instead. just wait until you hear how she deen fended his record on women's rights to choose. they actually think this is going to work? okay. you're watching "politicsnation" on msnbc. ♪ i look at her, and i just want to give her everything. yeah, you -- you know, everything can cost upwards of...[ whistles ] i did not want to think about that. relax, relax, relax. look at me, look at me. three words, dad -- e-trade financial consultants. so i can just go talk to 'em? just walk right in and talk to 'em. dude, those guys are pros. they'll hook you up with a solid plan. they'll -- wa-- wa-- wait a minute. bobby? bobby! what are you do
. we want your thoughts. take to twitter and facebook. a man in the united states on a student visa charged with plotting to blow up a new york building. an act where men, women and children would have been killed. was it too easy to get into the country? an accidental move by google that caused a massive shockwave today. ahhhh drill sound chirping electric shaver shaking remote tapping sound shaking drill chirping tapping shaking remote wouldn't it be great to have one less battery to worry about? car honking irping the 2012 sonata hybrid. the only hybrid with a lifetime hybrid battery warranty. from hyundai. everyone in the nicu, all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. to meet the
in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." >>> monday's third and final presidential debate will be a serious challenge for both candidates. it's focused on international policy and arena where both mitt romney lacks experience and the obama administration is under growing criticism, especially when it comes to the situation in the middle east. let's start with cnn's white house correspondent dan loathian. i assume officials in the white house campaign they know the president has questions he's going to answer. >> reporter: that's correct, wolf. and there doesn't appear to be much of a difference between the two candidates when it comes to foreign policy. but the president is getting prepared in study hall this weekend out at camp david. i think when you talk to folks out there, most people believe the president does have an advantage going into this debate. we expect he'll talk about getting osama bin laden but no one here at the white house, no one with the campaign is under estimating governor romney. he won the first debate. he had a
later, the ambassador to the united states at the time, he called me up and he was also a friend that also an academic in the past at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador and he said david. i had long forgotten about this whole thing. i said what phone? he said the president wants to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and in june of that year extensively i interviewed his life and the other syrian official. see what was the first meeting like? >> well after i explained why it wanted i wanted to do this, i went, my first substantive talk with him was mr. president you know i'm not an apologist for syria. i'm writing this book when you and i'm going to criticize you in this book and he said that's fine. i know you will criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know that in the past you have criticized my father's policies but you were always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him that you know mr. president one of the worst things you ever did. he goes, what's that? you let it know that you liked phil collins, the rock st
overseas instead of here in the united states of america. if mitt romney had been president when the auto industry was on the verge of collapse, we might not have an automobile industry today. we'd be buying cars from china instead of selling to them. >> mitt romney's path to the presidency is impossible without ohio's 18 electoral votes. right now winning ohio is not looking good for romney. six ohio polls were released this week. five of them have president obama leading. one is tied. president obama's average lead in ohio is 2.3 points. that's a big lead, seriously. now families in northern ohio have not forgotten what the rescue of the automobile industry did for their state. one in eight ohio jobs are about the automobile industry. this is why mitt romney is doing everything he possibly can to down play the impact of the auto rescue. his political director says the obama campaign dropped the auto bailout on us, but there's only so long you can ride that one trick pony. you think getting a paycheck is a one-trick pony? romney called last night's event a victory rally. today romney gav
>>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. the debates have done, the race is heading for the final stretch, and it is still all about the economy. so we'll start with a great panel it to see talk about the american economy, who is actually going on. >>> then, you've often heard that fracking is controversial. why? we have a debate to help you think it through. >>> and do you think you have enough money? what would be enough? we'll have a fascinating discussion on the subject with lord robert skidelsky, britain's most prominent economic historian o how to answer those questions. >>> and why in the world did the nation of mali get more mention this week in the debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy roading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coincidentally
at that point, bun of the biggest banks in the united states. things vice president changed. not in major terms of the bank. should be working for the bank as a whole. for the customer they shouldn't be seeking big rewards in themselves. contrast that to what goes on themselves. tremendous part of the conversation not just in bonuses. compared to what they would have been 20 or 25 years ago. no what kind of climate does that create? they get to elaborate a little bit. people who criticize this rule, they are sure to speculative access. infact, a lot of things are at the heart of the banking crisis. why did that go wild? i would argue that the kpep sags practices crept in into trading parts of the bank. so the lending offices said, how can hay make a lot of money and get a big bonus? over simplifying a little bit. it's true. the chairman of the citi bank. the biggest bank. a couple of trillion dollar banks. he said to me, we put these two different kinds of organizations together and it different work. and it's a cultural problem. you didn't just regular rate the losses. it created a tension in
the life of a united states ambassador, an american ambassador. this is serious stuff. americans deserve the truth on what happened. >> greta: so u.n. ambassador rice resign? earlier former secretary of defense donald rumsfeld went on the secretary. mr. secretary, nice to see you, sir. >> thank you. good to be with you. >> greta: there are many calls for ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, to resign. she has the backup of the secretary of state and the president, but there are calls for her to resign after going on all the talk shows and pushing this youtube video as the reason, the cause. your thoughts, sir? >> well, that's really up to the president and ambassador as far as i'm concerned. i think that the president can nominate who he wants, and the senate confirmed her. and she's the ambassador while she's there. i watched the presentation. and i thought it was amazing that someone in her position would go on with that degree of certainty, that fast, and that authoritiatively and be that wrong. >> greta: do you think she was perhaps hung out to dry? i thought it was unusual that the a
have ever served with in all my years in the united states senate and one of the people who, when you say his name in washington, when you say his name here i'm sure, when you say the name her call, you say integrity -- the name herb cole, you say integrity. [applause] your presence will be missed, particularly by me. we served together for a long time on the same committees. whenever i was not quite sure of what i was doing, i would pull him aside or go see him -- no, seriously, this man has a lot of wisdom. i will miss you, herb. [applause] my name is joe biden. i am deal by in -- i am jill biden's has been geared that is how i am known in washington -- husband. biden's that is how i am known in washington. last night, we had a little bit of a debate with a gentleman. and he is a gentleman. the demand from wisconsin, congressman ryan -- [booing] i hardly agree with anything he says, but i think he is a decent guy and he has a great family and he is a great husband and father. for that, i have great respect for him. [applause] but you know, anybody who watched the debate, i don't thi
legislature. but i'm also a serious guy. i think the presidency of the united states is a very serious office, and i think we have to address these issues in a very serious way. so i hope and expect that i will be liked by the people of this country as president of the united states. i certainly hope i will be liked by them on the 8th of november. [laughter] but i also think it's important to be somebody who is willing to make those tough choices. now, we have just heard two or three times from the vice president he's not going to raise taxes. i repeat, within days after you made that pledge, you broke it. you said, well, maybe as a last resort we'll do it. and you supported legislation this year that's involved tax increases not once, but twice. so that pledge isn't realistic, and i think the vice president knows it. i think the people of this country know it. the fact of the matter is that the next president of the united states is going to have to go to the white house seriously, he is going to have to work with the congress seriously. he can't turn to the congress and blame them for the f
that the main suspect in last year's iranian plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador to the united states pled guilty in a u.s. court yesterday. what does this maybe say about what the iranian government is willing to do? >> well, it did not need this particular case in order to prove once again that the iranians have been involved in terrorist activities against persons, against states, against countries for a long period of time. iran uses terrorism as a major tool of its international relations. it is as simple as all that. iran has plotted against others as well, individuals as well, and has also been shipping arms and equipment into areas inside the middle east. syria is one case now in point. there is an iranian force -- iranian forces are battling on syrian soil against syrians. there are iranians that have been in lebanon for quite some time and who have been handling equipment in lebanon, which has been of a great danger to israel. iran has used the state of sudan as an area through which they could send equipment through sudan to egypt to send that into the gaza strip. as i said, the
, the united states has made all these mistakes, kind of like a colonial power down through the years. >> right. >> obama spends a lot of time apologizing for america. do you think that will come out in the debate tonight? >> i hope so. romney has shown an ability to be very tough debater while still being very kind. it's a nice combo platter he has, but you have with obama the guy who denied american exceptionalism. we're the only non-imperialist superpower in the history of the world. is he unaware of that? oh, yes, i'm sure english, they think they are exceptional, too. that was his response to american exceptionalism. you had him bowing for all of the world leaders. you had him leading from behind during the arab spring which these guys were so enthusiastic about, and we see the result of it, with the death of our ambassador and three other americans. no, obama's view is not that america is an exceptional country, and i hope that does come out. >> steve mcmahon, we could have actually landed troops in benghazi. that is now coming out. the president actually met with leon panetta, and nothin
disappeared from the united states, and we conquered smallpox in the americas in 1971 and worldwide in 1977, sort of lent us confidence that really, there wasn't much that we couldn't do. as a result, the center began to diversify, to broaden its focus. and so we expanded into chronic disease areas. the national institute for occupational safety and health was incorporated into cdc in the early 1970s. much more recently, we've gotten into areas surrounding injury control and prevention. and of course we realized in the last few years that the infectious disease agenda is not over. certainly it's not in the developing world where it still causes a very heavy burden. apart from what aids is doing as probably the most egregious example that we've seen in our lifetimes, having surpassed malaria as the largest killer of people in africa, is tuberculosis, for which we've had good drugs, haven't used them wisely or enough in years past to reduce some of the problems that we're seeing today. and that's getting more and more serious now with multiply resistant strains of tuberculosis. tuberculosis i
is the chief executive officer of the united states. whoever the next president is, they need to demonstrate extraordinary presidential leadership. they need to use the power of the presidency to go to the american people, as ross perot did in 1992, to build a case that we are on a burning platform, to help them understand that everything has to be on the table, to provide principles and a framework for action, and to call the first three words of the constitution "we the people" to work with the president to solve the problem, because if you do not keep the economy strong, everything will suffer over time -- job opportunities, domestic tranquility. >> did you feel in 1992 and 1996, that we can get out of our deficits, and we ran four years of surpluses, prior to 9/11 and other things that happened in the last decade. did you think we had solved our problems? >> no, we were just lucky where weaver going through a good time. now we are any time of bad luck. i would really impressed if our president would take this issue right now and explain to the american people what he is going to do, beca
of the united states. >>> the obama campaign is calling that an out of context attack. the numbers they say mr. biden buried line including that that reflect high unemployment rising debt and smaller paychecks over the last four years. >> newt gingrich is talking about. >> newt beginnihe went on the r what he has to do. >>> it is a clear-cut situation. romney has to be clear and factual and stick to his grounds. he has to recognize he's up against the incumbent president of the united states. rom hee will t romney will try r call him. romney is going to have to communicate past layer and past obama to reach the american people. if he does that i think he could have a very good night and you could see a very good race by thursday morning. >> later in the show you are going to hear from romney's former debate coach who is with him during the primary. oo tonight's debate is exactly what we would like to hear from you on today. what would you like to hear from the candidates tonight? send your comments over to us. tweet them to us at foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com. >> those are the top stories making
does. he's both very commit very visible, he's something like a 70% name recognition united states. that's it you justin bieber. or we'd all we'd all probably know what he does. and when you go back over history and look at the thing starting to unfold in the election, he has deniability of one level after another. to me, the story became interested in a way because most people thought karl rove was finished in 2008 in the bush presidency started to come to an end. he had been forced out of the white house in 2007. he was the prime target in the two biggest scandals of the bush era, the valley plan affair in the united states attorney scandal. bush left a 22% approval rating from lowest in the history of the united states. and even top republican strategists like adderall and said that his version was tainted forever. no one would ever want to be a bush republican and work with karl rove. and the fact of the matter is he was back working again within a matter of weeks. and it became evident to me in early 2010 from about a year after obama took office. three things happen. the firs
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
is not fixed then it is time we change presidents and elect mitt romney the next president of the united states. tonight the forecast is that the president will win 287 electoral college votes. ari, the national polls are different on who has what lead by how much. but it is the battleground states. that lead is impressive. and there is a sizable lead in ohio and i'm aware of what you nailed in your rewrite the other night. >> tell me. >> what should these undecided voters have so much power? >> there is a funny thing happening. it is moving to a mobilization model. and what we are seeing now is, and we are seeing mobilization mez sages to the base. they are saying you have to get people excited. we are seeing a bullish attitude. and they don't need to focus as much on persuading. they are kicking into a gotv mode now. >> let's take a look at something put out today. new video with sara silverman which is about getting out the vote. >> in college mitt romney was so poor at harvard he had to sell stocks to get by. did you have to sell stocks to get by in college liz? >> no, i sold plasma in coll
. a lot of people i've heard about the trade conflict between the united states and china on solar panels. this is an interesting prism to view the chinese economy more broadly because this is a classic case of china really pushing hard for big innovation and winding up with little innovation that doesn't get them to where they want to go and part of china's innovation policy is targeting strategic emerging industries. these are the industries that beijing thinks will be the industry's of the future. the biggest is green energy including solar and wind and electric vehicles and other green energy technologies so they have unleashed a lot of funding to support grain energy innovation. most of that funding has created instead of mosul products continuing the same old model process innovation which is making the products created in the west faster and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are subs
one of which has the potential to decide who the next president of the united states will be. let's begin this hour's coverage in iowa where president obama kicked off a two-day coast-to-coast swing through eight states. he's calling it a campaign marathon extravaganza. likening it to an all-nighter. no surprise his itinerary consistents almost entirely of battleground states. cnn's chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is traveling with the president. >> reporter: wolf, president obama is hopping around the nation stumping for early votes and undecided voters. it's the kind of whirlwind tour you usually see in the last 48 hours before election day. the fact they're doing it 13 days before the ballots are cast is a sign just how important the early vote is to this campaign. now, from davenport, iowa, he heads to colorado, then he has stops in florida, virginia, again in ohio. he's going to las vegas, nevada, overnight. he also stops in las vegas -- in los angeles where he will be taping with jay leno and in chicago, illinois, where he'll be casting his own early ballot. h
and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. thank you very much. [applause] thank you, all. our class of commissioners for 2012. 14 commissions. thank you very much.
am running for the united states senate. to change the want leadership in washington. we can change that. that is why i am running for the senate. i want to pass a balanced budget. i am not your usual politician. i'm not one of the good old boys pay ed i will make this tough decisions in the united states senate. i will roll up my sleeves, work hard for you, and i will fight for you. >> now the opening statement from bob kerrey. >> thank you. i love nebraska. i always have and i always will. i was born here in lincoln. i left nebraska and went to war and came home, and i recovered from illness in the lincoln. i started a business that employed more than 700 people. i served as your governor, balancing our budget, and i left after four years and went back to business. i served as your son that -- as your senator, and again we balance our budget. i am a candidate for congress for the senate because congress needs to change, and i will fight to make that happen. i have never had and never will be a cookie cutter politician. i never have and never will be anything other than someone who
as president of the united states! [cheers and applause] i have seen too much pain, seen too much struggle to let this country get hit with another round of top-down economics. one of the main reasons we had this crisis is because big banks on wall street were allowed to make big bets with other people's money and governor romney wants to roll back the rules we put in place to stop that behavior? that's not going to happen. that is not going to happen. [applause] one of the main reasons record surpluses under bill clinton were turned into record deficits under george bush is because we put two wars and two tax cuts on a credit card. and now governor romney wants another $5 trillion in tax cuts that he can't pay for? not if i have anything to say about it. that's not going to happen. [applause] we are not going to let this country fall backward. not now. not with so much at stake. we've got to move forward. we need to invest in small business and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at commun
for the passport. can you imagine the canadian government coming to the united states congress and asking us for blank passports? domeback. he's dealing with every level from the white house, jimmy carter, who actually approved, tony had one foot out the door in germany and a cable came into his head stop, president is reviewing. 20 minutes later, godspeed, good luck, from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. because as he said, if this didn't a wealthy american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadians, working wit with a we us, working with the cia bureaucracy, and is working with the state department. and it's difficult to get everybody on the same page with the idea that they are calling the best bad idea they could come up with. he did all that. but beyond that he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarters often tells us don't do that. don't go in the airport with them. if it goes wrong, they will look to you. without even thinking about it they will turn and look
should have a first-class citizenship. this is the united states of america. it is not united airlines with its first-class and coach. this is the united states of america where every citizen should have equal rights, equal citizenship, under the law. we have a mission. we must call for this spirit. more than ever before there is an urgency now. some folks might be wary because the road to freedom has never been an easy one. some folks have scars on their backs. some folks have been that still aches in their soul. we cannot stop. james baldwin said that human history is a perpetual testament to the achievement of the impossible dream of america must drive us forward. we must not fail now. when other people want to drive us, we must be the hope. when people drive us to doubt, we must be the fate. i learned this from my family and my parents and my grandparents that one folks tried to tell you if you are lesser when one person stand up straight and strong, and they lived an entire nation. [applause] when one person defiantly refuses to be relegated to second class, we are all elevated. t
immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you come to the united states? >> i came to united states in 1985. >> how old were you? >> in may of 1985, i
talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the unit
inability to understand what's going on in the middle east and the threats that the united states, israel, and our arab friends face and inindicative of a larger problem globally. i think for governor romney to articulate a peace through strength through foreign policy will be a substantial contrast with what the obama administration has failed to achieve. >> everyone's focusing on benghazi at the moment. before we get to this, talk about the world view. look at egypt turning his back on must b mu.you've got russia,e islamists. tell me more about your view of that world view and how you think mr. romney could define it tomorrow. >> well, i think this goes to the basic issue of america's place in the world. do you think as president obama does that america's too strong, that we've had too much influence, that we're kansa disproportionately successful around the worn america that withdraws, that's less assertive will make other nations more favorably inclined to us and make the world more peaceful. that's like looking at the world through the wrong end of a telescope. i think the notion of
in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf area was the port of embarkation for the wars in the pacific. just this week we brought in a world war ii 16-inch bottle ship gun to the marine head lands to put it up at battery townsly which would have been the pinnacle of coastal artillery in world war ii. so, we now have a canon or artillery collection that spans in our park that spans from the civil war to the cold war, including a preserve 19-missile base. some of you also know that during the 1906 earthquake, the army assisted greatly in the respo
the campaign coverage and look at folks who serve as role models here in the united states and abroad. there are four change makers, britain's former prime minister tony blair as he puts it, is much too young to consider retirement. he's traveling the world as a global politician and problem solver. then a young woman who survived disaster. she was a swimsuit model when she was caught in the 2004 tsunami. and carolyn miles the ceo to save the children. she's no stranger to educating and feeding kids around the world. but you might be surprised to hear what she's doing to help poor children right here at home. and that brings us to charles best. he has come up with a brilliant way for people who want to donate money for specific projects and public schools. first tony blair why it's so important to continue working and keep an open mind. >> i think the big big battle of the world is between the open mind and the closed mind. the open mind looks at the problem and sees potential and culture and say that's interesting. then there are those who say this is a threat. i want to close it dow
tells well. the time i served in the united states senate i've been an independent voice for the people in the state and i've gotten results from the people of the state. in this campaign today, seven newspapers have made an editorial the as to who they would endorse. and all seven endorsed my candidacy. one of the reasons, not the only but one of the reasons that those newspapers endorsed me from the spread to california and a lot of places in between because of my record and the results that i achieved for the people in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have ser
for president of the united states. >> today in a "democracy now!" special, we look at the life and legacy of senator george mcgovern, best known for running against president richard nixon and an anti-4 platform. >> as one whose heart has eight for the past 10 years of the agony of vietnam, i will hold the senseless bombing on and our role day. >> as a family spokesperson confirms senator mcgovern is in hospice care, unresponsive and there in the end of his life, we will play extended excerpts of the documentary "one bright shining moment: the forgotten summer of george mcgovern." it traces his historic campaigne presidency. >> that is the highlight of my life, i guess, winning the democratic nomination of the oldest political party in american history. i remember excited faces, people laughing and talking, some weeping. there was a lot of emotion and passion in that campaign. and i will take those memories with me the rest of my life. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in sacramento,
of the united states, the budget, on its current trajectory, will bankrupt the country if we do not do something. >> what is the worst that could happen? >> what almost happened last summer when the 80th, the republican idiots, and decided we can have the country defaults on its debt and that would be fine. if you have ever been a banking reporter, which i have, if there is anything resembling a default on u.s. debt, it is a disaster worldwide. i thought we had learned something from that a year ago. apparently, we have not. the worst thing that happens is a u.s. default on its debt. it would be catastrophic. for no reason, idiotic. it is crazy. >> what is the result? >> every bank in the united states, every major bank, is bankrupt. suddenly, your capital is gone. a lot of capital is tied up in government securities. >> what happens if i go to the bank and what my money? >> it might or may not still be there. it is not like the banks would close. they would not be able to land. -- lend. it was like four years ago where you were facing massive bank failures. you still get your money but you woul
it needs more safety information after the disaster in japan. >>> a fire fight between united states and afghanistan soldiers this weekend is undermining hopes of helping tensions between the allies. it started at a checkpoint after a mortar wept off. a united states soldier and american civilian were killed. officials are calling for calm. . >> the city of oak creek wisconsin finding strength in the aftermath of last month's deadly shooting at a temple. at oak creek high school this weekend students and temple members turned out to plant a garden filled with flowers as a gesture of unity. the garden will represent strength and diversity. >> it's really the life that comes, the rebirth of something great after something tragic. >> reporter: the community held a dinner last flight to raise money for those who are recovering for the families who lost loved ones. six were killed in that shooting. three were injured. the gunman then killed himself. >> in election 2012 news, all eyes on denver as romney and the president get ready for their first debate on wednesday night. romney insi
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